Can You Die From Xanax Withdrawal?

Xanax is one of the most commonly prescribed benzodiazepines in the United States. It is also one of the most addictive. Like all benzodiazepines, Xanax is a central nervous system (CNS) depressant designed to treat patients with an acute panic disorder. It is not an antidepressant and not a pain killer, although people who become addicted to Xanax may also be addicted to painkillers and opioids. If you are concerned that a Xanax addiction is causing harm in your life, contact Crestview Recovery at 866.262.0531.

Xanax withdrawal happens when a user suddenly stops taking the drug or abruptly decreases the dosage. As expected, higher regular doses of Xanax result in more intense symptoms of withdrawal. If you suspect that a friend or loved one has become dependent on Xanax, please encourage them to seek Xanax addiction treatment.

Xanax Withdrawal Can Be Severe

Withdrawing from benzodiazepines such as Xanax can cause a range of symptoms. If you are asking can you die from Xanax withdrawal, it’s important to understand that it is serious about trying to withdraw from Xanax if you are alone. When you have been abusing Xanax for a while, and your tolerance for the drug is high, withdrawal is going to be more difficult.

At a center for addiction treatment, you will be able to get the support you need to break free from your addiction to Xanax in a safe and supportive way for your recovery. Quitting Xanax can be accomplished, but it’s important to wean off the drug slowly.

Can You Die From Xanax Withdrawal?

Xanax withdrawal can produce mild symptoms or become very difficult to manage in a short period of time. Symptoms of withdrawal can begin as early as five hours after your last consumption of Xanax, and it’s important to pay attention to withdrawal symptoms if you have been abusing the substance for a long time. Symptoms of Xanax withdrawal include:

  • Anxiety, trouble sleeping, and panic attacks
  • Difficulty concentrating, feeling irritable, and muscle pain
  • Headaches and nausea
  • Seizures and psychosis in those who are heavily dependent on the drug, including hallucinations
  • Heart palpitations and trembling

When you are experiencing symptoms of withdrawal, this often leads to a relapse if you are alone because this stops the withdrawal. It is not safe to stop abusing Xanax on your own. Get the treatment you need to move forward with your life.

Addiction Treatment After Detox

It is important to pursue treatment if a Xanax addiction has taken over your life. Withdrawal is going to take a few days or more, but this is only the physical aspect of your addiction. You have to pay attention to the reasons why you started abusing prescription drugs in the first place so that you can truly heal. When you are in an addiction treatment program, you may experience:

  • Group therapy sessions to work through problems in your recovery with peers
  • Individual counseling to discuss your triggers and learn new ways to cope
  • Activities that take you outside to try new experiences and move forward with your life
  • Supportive peers who are ready to walk with you through your recovery journey
  • People who understand your addiction for the first time in your life

You can recover from an addiction to Xanax, once you make the decision that treatment is necessary. With a treatment plan and a counselor in place, you will begin to see why you are not alone in your recovery. A Xanax addiction does not have to be ruling your life forever, and you can safely remove the drug from your life with help.

Learning Relapse Prevention Techniques

Relapse is a common part of the recovery process. While no one sets out to relapse, it happens to many people working on sobriety. Relapse prevention strategies can be a bit different for everyone. You may even discover that what used to work for you is no longer effective at keeping you sober. Communication is useful for relapse prevention, and this means good communication with peers, family, and your counselor.

One of the key relapse prevention strategies is to develop a strong support network. This could include family members, friends in recovery groups, or professional counselors. When you feel yourself slipping back into old habits or struggling with cravings, reach out to your support system for help and advice.

Another important strategy is practicing self-care and making time for yourself. This can involve meditation, exercise, or other healthy activities that help you manage stress levels and take care of your mental health. If you find yourself struggling with negative thoughts or emotions, try to focus on being present in the moment and practicing mindfulness techniques.

Healthy Habits Reduce Stress

You can learn new exercise routines, mindfulness, yoga, and other healthy ways to lower your stress that will help you avoid a relapse. Even if you do relapse and start abusing substances, you can still go back to your sobriety. Once you build a solid support network of peers who are also in recovery, it becomes a bit easier to reach out for help at times you feel like using. If you relapse, you have to take the step to get back to your program and commit to your sobriety once again.

Help For Xanax Addiction Now

If you are scared that you can die from Xanax withdrawal, it’s time to get the help you deserve. Crestview Recovery is there to help you build a long-term sobriety program once your detox is complete. Get started now by contacting us at 866.262.0531 and begin your recovery.

Can You Die From Xanax Withdrawal?

Xanax is one of the most commonly prescribed benzodiazepines in the United States. It is also one of the most addictive. Like all benzodiazepines, Xanax is a central nervous system (CNS) depressant designed to treat patients with an acute panic disorder. It is not an antidepressant and not a pain killer, although people who become addicted to Xanax may also be addicted to painkillers and opioids. If you are concerned that a Xanax addiction is causing harm in your life, contact Crestview Recovery at 866.262.0531.

Xanax withdrawal happens when a user suddenly stops taking the drug or abruptly decreases the dosage. As expected, higher regular doses of Xanax result in more intense symptoms of withdrawal. If you suspect that a friend or loved one has become dependent on Xanax, please encourage them to seek Xanax addiction treatment.

Xanax Withdrawal Can Be Severe

Withdrawing from benzodiazepines such as Xanax can cause a range of symptoms. If you are asking can you die from Xanax withdrawal, it's important to understand that it is serious about trying to withdraw from Xanax if you are alone. When you have been abusing Xanax for a while, and your tolerance for the drug is high, withdrawal is going to be more difficult.

At a center for addiction treatment, you will be able to get the support you need to break free from your addiction to Xanax in a safe and supportive way for your recovery. Quitting Xanax can be accomplished, but it's important to wean off the drug slowly.

Can You Die From Xanax Withdrawal?

Xanax withdrawal can produce mild symptoms or become very difficult to manage in a short period of time. Symptoms of withdrawal can begin as early as five hours after your last consumption of Xanax, and it's important to pay attention to withdrawal symptoms if you have been abusing the substance for a long time. Symptoms of Xanax withdrawal include:

  • Anxiety, trouble sleeping, and panic attacks
  • Difficulty concentrating, feeling irritable, and muscle pain
  • Headaches and nausea
  • Seizures and psychosis in those who are heavily dependent on the drug, including hallucinations
  • Heart palpitations and trembling

When you are experiencing symptoms of withdrawal, this often leads to a relapse if you are alone because this stops the withdrawal. It is not safe to stop abusing Xanax on your own. Get the treatment you need to move forward with your life.

Addiction Treatment After Detox

It is important to pursue treatment if a Xanax addiction has taken over your life. Withdrawal is going to take a few days or more, but this is only the physical aspect of your addiction. You have to pay attention to the reasons why you started abusing prescription drugs in the first place so that you can truly heal. When you are in an addiction treatment program, you may experience:

  • Group therapy sessions to work through problems in your recovery with peers
  • Individual counseling to discuss your triggers and learn new ways to cope
  • Activities that take you outside to try new experiences and move forward with your life
  • Supportive peers who are ready to walk with you through your recovery journey
  • People who understand your addiction for the first time in your life

You can recover from an addiction to Xanax, once you make the decision that treatment is necessary. With a treatment plan and a counselor in place, you will begin to see why you are not alone in your recovery. A Xanax addiction does not have to be ruling your life forever, and you can safely remove the drug from your life with help.

Learning Relapse Prevention Techniques

Relapse is a common part of the recovery process. While no one sets out to relapse, it happens to many people working on sobriety. Relapse prevention strategies can be a bit different for everyone. You may even discover that what used to work for you is no longer effective at keeping you sober. Communication is useful for relapse prevention, and this means good communication with peers, family, and your counselor.

One of the key relapse prevention strategies is to develop a strong support network. This could include family members, friends in recovery groups, or professional counselors. When you feel yourself slipping back into old habits or struggling with cravings, reach out to your support system for help and advice.

Another important strategy is practicing self-care and making time for yourself. This can involve meditation, exercise, or other healthy activities that help you manage stress levels and take care of your mental health. If you find yourself struggling with negative thoughts or emotions, try to focus on being present in the moment and practicing mindfulness techniques.

Healthy Habits Reduce Stress

You can learn new exercise routines, mindfulness, yoga, and other healthy ways to lower your stress that will help you avoid a relapse. Even if you do relapse and start abusing substances, you can still go back to your sobriety. Once you build a solid support network of peers who are also in recovery, it becomes a bit easier to reach out for help at times you feel like using. If you relapse, you have to take the step to get back to your program and commit to your sobriety once again.

Help For Xanax Addiction Now

If you are scared that you can die from Xanax withdrawal, it's time to get the help you deserve. Crestview Recovery is there to help you build a long-term sobriety program once your detox is complete. Get started now by contacting us at 866.262.0531 and begin your recovery.

Table of Contents
Scroll to Top
Skip to content